For The Love Of Murphys The Behind The Counter Story Of A Great American Retailer PDF Download

Are you looking for read ebook online? Search for your book and save it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Download For The Love Of Murphys The Behind The Counter Story Of A Great American Retailer PDF full book. Access full book title For The Love Of Murphys The Behind The Counter Story Of A Great American Retailer.

The Language of the Soul

The Language of the Soul
Author: Jeff Crosby
Publisher: Broadleaf Books
Total Pages: 234
Release: 2023-05-23
Genre: Religion
ISBN: 1506480551

Download The Language of the Soul Book in PDF, ePub and Kindle

For over fifteen years, writer Jeff Crosby has been searching for a language of the soul--a way to articulate our deepest longings. Through the years he gathered clues from within global music styles, from different cultures, from his own Christian tradition and its sacred texts--and from deep within himself. A lover of words, he sought not only to translate our longings into words but to understand why these seemingly universal yearnings have long remained unnamed. Now in these pages, Crosby gifts us with those so-often-untranslatable desires of our hearts, guiding us to finally find the words and luminous insights for our own longings for home, for friendship, for forgiveness, and for transformation--and how God meets us in the midst of these longings. Eschewing easy answers, Crosby begins the naming process, helping us to make connections--and to recognize, within ourselves and our faith, our heart's true home.


The Bibliography of Appalachia

The Bibliography of Appalachia
Author:
Publisher: McFarland
Total Pages: 236
Release: 2009-02-13
Genre: History
ISBN:

Download The Bibliography of Appalachia Book in PDF, ePub and Kindle

"This bibliography of books, articles, monographs, and dissertations features more than 4,700 entries, divided into twenty-four subject areas such as activism and protest; Appalachian studies; arts and crafts; community culture and folklife; education; environment; ethnicity, race and identity; health and medicine; media and stereotypes; recreation and tourism; religion; and women and gender. Two indexes conclude the bibliography"--Provided by publisher.


Pennsylvania Heritage

Pennsylvania Heritage
Author:
Publisher:
Total Pages: 644
Release: 2008
Genre: Pennsylvania
ISBN:

Download Pennsylvania Heritage Book in PDF, ePub and Kindle


The Schenley Experiment

The Schenley Experiment
Author: Jake Oresick
Publisher: Penn State Press
Total Pages: 169
Release: 2017-05-05
Genre: Education
ISBN: 0271079754

Download The Schenley Experiment Book in PDF, ePub and Kindle

The Schenley Experiment is the story of Pittsburgh’s first public high school, a social incubator in a largely segregated city that was highly—even improbably—successful throughout its 156-year existence. Established in 1855 as Central High School and reorganized in 1916, Schenley High School was a model of innovative public education and an ongoing experiment in diversity. Its graduates include Andy Warhol, actor Bill Nunn, and jazz virtuoso Earl Hines, and its prestigious academic program (and pensions) lured such teachers as future Pulitzer Prize winner Willa Cather. The subject of investment as well as destructive neglect, the school reflects the history of the city of Pittsburgh and provides a study in both the best and worst of urban public education practices there and across the Rust Belt. Integrated decades before Brown v. Board of Education, Schenley succumbed to default segregation during the “white flight” of the 1970s; it rose again to prominence in the late 1980s, when parents camped out in six-day-long lines to enroll their children in visionary superintendent Richard C. Wallace’s reinvigorated school. Although the historic triangular building was a cornerstone of its North Oakland neighborhood and a showpiece for the city of Pittsburgh, officials closed the school in 2008, citing over $50 million in necessary renovations—a controversial event that captured national attention. Schenley alumnus Jake Oresick tells this story through interviews, historical documents, and hundreds of first-person accounts drawn from a community indelibly tied to the school. A memorable, important work of local and educational history, his book is a case study of desegregation, magnet education, and the changing nature and legacies of America’s oldest public schools.


One Hundred and One Nights

One Hundred and One Nights
Author: Benjamin Buchholz
Publisher: Back Bay Books
Total Pages: 239
Release: 2011-12-01
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 0316191906

Download One Hundred and One Nights Book in PDF, ePub and Kindle

After 13 years in America, Abu Saheeh has returned to his native Iraq, a nation transformed by the American military presence. Alone in a new city, he has exactly what he wants: freedom from his past. Then he meets Layla, a whimsical fourteen-year-old girl who enchants him with her love of American pop culture. Enchanted by Layla's stories and her company, Abu Saheeh settles into the city's rhythm and begins rebuilding his life. But two sudden developments -- his alliance with a powerful merchant and his employment of a hot-headed young assistant -- reawaken painful memories, and not even Layla may be able to save Abu Saheeh from careening out of control and endangering all around them. A breathtaking tale of friendship, love, and betrayal, One Hundred and One Nights is an unforgettable novel about the struggle for salvation and the power of family.


Sewn in Coal Country

Sewn in Coal Country
Author: Robert P. Wolensky
Publisher: Penn State Press
Total Pages: 415
Release: 2020-04-24
Genre: History
ISBN: 027108653X

Download Sewn in Coal Country Book in PDF, ePub and Kindle

By the mid-1930s, Pennsylvania’s anthracite coal industry was facing a steady decline. Mining areas such as the Wyoming Valley around the cities of Wilkes-Barre and Pittston were full of willing workers (including women) who proved irresistibly attractive to New York City’s “runaway shops”—ladies’ apparel factories seeking lower labor and other costs. The International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union (ILGWU) soon followed, and the Valley became a thriving hub of clothing production and union activity. This volume tells the story of the area’s apparel industry through the voices of men and women who lived it. Drawing from an archive of over sixty audio-recorded interviews within the Northeastern Pennsylvania Oral and Life History Collection, Sewn in Coal Country showcases sixteen stories told by workers, shop owners, union leaders, and others. The interview subjects recount the ILGWU-led movement to organize the shops, the conflicts between the district union and the national office in New York, the solidarity unionism approach of leader Min Matheson, the role of organized crime within the business, and the failed efforts to save the industry in the 1980s and 1990s. Robert P. Wolensky places the narratives in the larger context of American clothing manufacturing during the period and highlights their broader implications for the study of labor, gender, the working class, and oral history. Highly readable and thoroughly enlightening, this significant contribution to the study of labor history and women’s history will appeal to anyone interested in the relationships among workers, unions, management, and community; the effects of economic change on an area and its residents; the role of organized crime within the industry; and Pennsylvania history—especially the social history of industrialization and deindustrialization during the twentieth century.


Hex

Hex
Author: Maggie Estep
Publisher: Crown
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2010-03-10
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 0307530825

Download Hex Book in PDF, ePub and Kindle

Having drifted through thirty-three years of life, Ruby Murphy has put down roots in a rootless place: Coney Island. A recovering alcoholic who is fanatical in her love for animals and her misanthropic friends, Ruby lives above a furniture store and works at the musty Coney Island Museum. One day, Ruby is on the subway heading into Manhattan when the train stalls between stations. An elegant blond woman with a scarred face strikes up a conversation, and a misunderstanding between the two women leads to an offer Ruby decides she can’t refuse. The woman needs her boyfriend followed, and she thinks Ruby is the woman to do it—and do it right. Ruby’s life has been flat and painful lately. The Coney Island Museum isn’t doing much business, Ruby’s live-in boyfriend has moved out, and her best friend Oliver is battling cancer. Ruby agrees to follow the woman’s boyfriend, Frank, a man who works at Belmont Racetrack and seems to hang out in odd places with bad company. Ruby soon finds herself pushed headfirst into horse racing’s seamy underbelly. This is a dangerous world where nothing is as it appears, and people and horses seem to have limited life spans. When Ruby finds herself staring down the barrel of a loaded gun, she begins to have second thoughts. Only now it’s far too late.


The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal

The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal
Author: Robert Murphy
Publisher: Regnery Publishing
Total Pages: 210
Release: 2009-03-31
Genre: History
ISBN: 1596980966

Download The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal Book in PDF, ePub and Kindle

Provides irrefutable evidence that not only did government interference with the market cause the Great Depression (and our current economic collapse), but Herbert Hoover's and Franklin Delano Roosevelt's big government policies afterwards made it much longer and much worse.--From publisher description.